Nigerian Dallas Doctor Sentenced For Operating ‘Pill Mill’ - Naija USA

Nigerian Dallas Doctor Sentenced For Operating ‘Pill Mill’

By on March 31, 2016

DALLAS (AP) – A federal judge has sentenced the operator of a North Texas “pill mill” that conspired to illegally distribute prescription drugs to a lengthy prison term.

Dr. Theodore Okechuku, an anesthesiologist, was sentenced Wednesday to 25 years in prison.

Authorities say he operated a Dallas medical clinic that functioned as a place to unlawfully obtain prescriptions. Drug dealers who were part of the conspiracy recruited people from homeless shelters and elsewhere to visit the clinic.

Okechuku was paid for visits and then those receiving prescriptions were taken to pharmacies to obtain their orders. The dealers then sold the drugs on the street.

One other conspirator convicted at trial and two who entered guilty pleas have received prison sentences. Two others convicted at trial and two who pleaded guilty await sentencing.

NORWICH, CT - MARCH 23: Oxycodone pain pills prescribed for a patient with chronic pain lie on display on March 23, 2016 in Norwich, CT. Communities nationwide are struggling with the unprecidented opioid pain pill and heroin addiction epidemic. On March 15, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC), announced guidelines for doctors to reduce the amount of opioid painkillers prescribed, in an effort to curb the epidemic. The CDC estimates that most new heroin addicts first became hooked on prescription pain medication before graduating to heroin, which is stronger and cheaper. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

NORWICH, CT – MARCH 23: Oxycodone pain pills prescribed for a patient with chronic pain lie on display on March 23, 2016 in Norwich, CT. Communities nationwide are struggling with the unprecidented opioid pain pill and heroin addiction epidemic. On March 15, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC), announced guidelines for doctors to reduce the amount of opioid painkillers prescribed, in an effort to curb the epidemic. The CDC estimates that most new heroin addicts first became hooked on prescription pain medication before graduating to heroin, which is stronger and cheaper. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

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